Posts in category wood-working

Tablesaw Dust Collector

I have an ancient Craftsman tablesaw which had no dust collection system for it. The underside of the saw was simply open, and sawdust went everywhere. In order to get it under control, I cut a cardboard box to fit under the tablesaw. Since it was large enough to fill the space under the saw, it collected the sawdust quite well, but it was too large to pull out from under the saw's legs. That was my temporary solution for the past decade, but I had done some work on the tablesaw, and when I had put it back on its feet, I had not put the cardboard box in place. Time to get around to implementing a better solution.

Using these (scrap) materials and some scrap plywood...

boards-cut.jpg

... I built a shallow box with a dust port.

The top view:

assembled-top.jpg

The bottom view:

assembled-bottom.jpg

I used pocket-hole screws for the frame of the box, tacked the plywood into place with a few nails, then used construction adhesive around the edges of the plywood to keep it in place and allowed that to dry.

The lip on the box rests on top of the sheet metal body on that end, and on the other end, I put a 1x4 inside the sheetmetal lip of the body of the tablesaw.

mounting-board.jpg

Screws inserted through the 2x2 board on the end screwed into this board so both ends of the box are supported. Installed, it looks like this from below:

installed-bottom.jpg

The end result looks like this:

installed-corner.jpg

This will allow me to use some of the space under the tablesaw that used to be entirely filled with that cardboard box.

Lining a Truck Toolbox

I bought a toolbox for my truck, but before I loaded it up with tools, I wanted to take steps to increase its expected serviceable life. One of the tools I carry is a hydraulic floor jack. This thing is heavy, and has a tendency to slide around. I didn't want it (and the other heavy, sliding-prone items it shares the box with) to hammer on the box. I grabbed some plywood I happened to have, and cut a section to fit the floor of the toolbox to protect the bottom. That left about 8-9" of plywood of the same length, so I cut that in half to make two ~4"-wide pieces. I nailed some scrap 2-by material to that to create a slot for end-caps, and made end-caps from some other scrap plywood I had lying around.

Each corner looks like this,

corner.jpg

With the ends like this.

end.jpg

The end-caps hold the long walls vertical, and the 2-by bits nailed to the long walls keep the end-caps where they're supposed to be. So everything stays put, but it can all be disassembled and removed.

The end result looked like this:

top-view.jpg

side-view.jpg

Since the toolbox has seen a bit of actual use, you can see the dark gray places on the right half where the hydraulic floor jack's metal wheels have been sitting and sliding around. If you decide to build something like this, I'd recommend building the walls the full height on the inside of the toolbox; I noticed some scrapes where other tools have been rubbing on the inside walls. But for something thrown together quickly with materials already on hand, I'm satisfied with the result.

Making Stake Pocket Anchors

I bought a toolbox for my pickup truck, and needed to mount it to the bed rails securely. Using some J-hooks to bolt it to the metal inside the stake pockets did not work well enough; the loaded toolbox shifted from side to side while driving, scraping up the bed rail covers in the process. I needed a more secure mounting option for the toolbox that did not require drilling holes in my truck, and if I could avoid drilling holes in the toolbox, even better. Oh, and I needed to get it done immediately to avoid additional damage. While Magnum Manufacturing offers the stake pocket tie downs they use for their headache racks, I needed to solve the problem immediately, not wait for a well-made product to arrive.

The concept is to have an assembly that fits into the stake pocket which I can bolt onto from the top, and fasten from the side. My solution was to cut some scrap 2x4 down to fill the stake pocket, and cut out space for a bracket, and a recess for the bolt.

cad-wood-block.png

I fabricated the bracket from 1/8"-thick 2x2" angle iron; cutting it to size, drilling counter-sunk holes for the screws, and tapping a hole for a bolt on top.

cad-angle-iron-finished.png

I drilled pilot holes in the wood block and assembled the anchors with exterior wood screws:

cad-assmbly.png

Given that I was in a hurry and making it up as I went along, the actual anchors looked a bit more like this:

real-assembly.jpg

I dropped the anchors into the stake pockets and marked the location of the hole inside the truck bed, then drilled a pilot hole in the center of that.

real-marked-assemblies.jpg

Installing the anchors in the truck meant dropping the anchor in place

dropped-in-place.jpg

and securing it with an exterior wood screw and fender washer.

secured-in-place.jpg

From there, it was a matter of lining up the toolbox slot with the bolt hole

aligned-box-slot.jpg

and bolting it down.

Now, the toolbox is much more solidly anchored to the truck.

Making toy wooden swords

One of my sons bought an inexpensive wooden sword at a nearby Renaissance festival. And naturally, his older sister wanted one as well, but...it's gotta be a bigger one. Sibling rivalry? What's that?

Looking at the design of the sword, I could see it was pretty straight-forward to replicate, so I told her that if she bought a 6' 1x3 select pine board at the local hardware store, I'd turn it into a sword. Woodworking is fun! And educational!

The basic design is to cut a board for the cross-guard, 5 to 6 inches long. Then cut another piece to the length of the blade and hilt. I mounted the latter board on a 1x6 with a clamping set to get a straight tapered cut from the tip to where the cross-guard would be. I then put the tablesaw blade at about a 45 and gave it 4 cuts to provide some shape to the blade's cross-section and that look of having a pseudo-edge. My daughter had sketched what she wanted the hilt to look like, so I used a bandsaw to get a rough shape to the grip and pommel, then took that to the bench sander and shaped it generally "by eye". For the part of the grip where the cross-guard belongs, I was aiming for a shape that would fit into a slot cut with a 3/4" straight router bit. Once I had the size of that determined, I shaped the rest of the grip and pommel to have a cross-section no larger than that. Then I mounted the cross-guard in the mill and cut the slot into the center with a 3/4" router bit. Four passes on the tablesaw to take off the corners, and I had a cross-guard.

The two pieces looked like this:

short-sword-disassembled.jpg

The select pine is right at 3/4" thick, so the cross-guard slid over the hilt with a friction fit.

short-sword.jpg

Of course, a 6-foot board was enough to make *two* swords, so I made an even longer, two-handed sword.

long-sword.jpg

The dangerous duo:

both-swords.jpg

While a proper template and a router would have yielded more precise results for the grips, overall I was pleased with how they turned out.